Sabina school

now browsing by tag

 
 

Day 10: Use and Value diveristy

Grace with course participants Nixon, Jane, Richard exploring the Sabina food forest

Exploring the food forest at Sabina school. A diversity of plants has created a lush and productive landscape around the school where 6 hours ago there was only hard flat dry ground. When the food forest was originally proposed there were doubts from many sides that the soils could even support life such as this. However as the should build and come alive with microbes, worms and everything else that comprises healthy soil it can hold more water, more nutrients become available and the whole ecology develops.

The idea tha chemical farming can feedn the world is a huge mistake, enormous damage has been done and huge debt created in the process. Debts to banks is one thing but debt to the environment is far more serious. Permaculture teaches us that nature will rebuild, will heal if only we let it. Embracing the diversity of species and moving away from simple monocultures is the key as demonstrated so clearly here.

The teaching team that has delivered the PDCUG18. We have used the course to help tain and develop new trainers and tutors and are planning to develop this process into an academy for permaculture.

A wonderful diversity of people have come together to deliver this course. From Uganda, Kenya, Wales and England. Actually 8 of the team come from the same small area of Wales which we are very proud of but really it is permaculture and a love of practical solutions that has drawn us all together and it was a proud moment to stand in line as part of the amazing team of people.

 

Integrate rather than segregate

A healthy eco-system is built on mutually beneficial relationships and it is these connections that build resilience and bio-diversity. Permacultureʼs 8th principle is integrate rather than segregateʼ which speaks to the importance of seeing how all aspects of a natural system support the health of the whole and its ability to regenerate and prosper. When we fail to equally honour the contribution each organisms makes, we break away from the wisdom of nature and start to loose our understanding of the symbiotic bigger picture life requires to thrive.

As part of the current PDC being facilitated by Sector 39 at Sabina School,
Uganda, we linked the understanding of integrated rather than segregateʼ to the 7
principles that established the ethical and functional guidelines for setting up a co-operative. The founding co-operative principles were established back in 1800 by Robert Owen from Newtown, Wales and in some ways relate to the logical and empowering principles of permaculture if applied to a social-economic enterprise.

Humanity initially evolved from a tribal culture where each member of a community had a significant role that supported the whole. Both permaculture
and the co-operative model can be connected to the understanding that it truly
does take a community to meet humanities physiological, psychological and aesteemedʼ basic needs to have a healthy, happy and fulfilling life. When humanʼs are able to recreate a symbiotic community it establishes a diverse, creative,rewarding and meaningful infrastructure where everyone is appreciated for their contribution.

So what causes us to asegregateʼ? When economy becomes the driving force of a
system, the life enhancing behaviour of co-operation is quickly killed.

Compartmentalizing life for profit has enabled rapid destruction of the precious
eco-systems that provide a hospitable environment for us to live. Segregation has enabled the earthʼs finite resources to be abused for the gross profit of a few. No system in nature survives with the ongoing practice of segregation.

When we work with the permaculture ethics of Earth care, People care and Fair
shareʼ we inspire creative, solution focused approaches that look at how the end
for economy can be integrated into a symbiotic relationship with community and ecology. So, as our PDC group begins the design process to see how

permaculture can best support the evolution of Sabina School, it feels like an
exciting challenge to develop both a near future and long-term plan of action that can integrate the social, ecological and economic needs of this beauty rural community, full of potential and fertile soils.

Day 8: Integrate

A CARROT A Day – UGANDA PERMACULTURE DESIGN COURSE. .. You can see the joy in this photo as some of our students harvest carrots for our meals. Every day there’s a range of practical tasks to be done from harvesting to weeding to topping up the compost loos with dried coffee bean husks – a waste product that can be used as carbon rich ‘soak’ to balance the high nitrogen content of the loo contents! These essential jobs are accompanied by chat and laughter as friendships are made and experiences shared. Daily practicals are also hugely enjoyable, breaking up the classroom learning about all aspects of sustainable systems from food to funding to organisational structures. Everyone’s getting more and more excited as they progress in anticipation of applying all this when they get home. And there’s a serious side of course. Yesterday I sat down with a Kenyan lady who seemed upset – she told me that there were floods in her district , with people losing their homes and huge amounts of soil erosion. She was sad but also grateful to learn about alternative practices that nurture the earth and people whilst also mitigating climate change – and to know that we are all in this together and will support each other however we can. It was very humbling. carrot

Day 2: Nature catches and stores every drop of sunlight

Permaculture principle #2: Catch and store energy

When we observe nature what we see is plants reaching out in all directions to trap the energy of the sun. Only plants (except some odd exceptions) can do this, using chlorophyll to turn sunlight into sugars and starches; stored forms of energy, photosynthesis.

Simply put they use the energy of sunlight to join CO2 and H20 together, forming sugars, starches and carbohydrates. When we digest these sugars we break the bond, releasing the energy and the CO2 and H2O becomes available to the environment again.. it’s a simple system and pretty amazing in its power when you think about it. This idea of catching and storing available energy is the backbone of the second of David Homgren’s permaculture principles.

Permaculture tutor trainees Han Rees and Charles Mugarura preparing their presentation on soils for Day 2 of the PDC

Here at Sector39, as a training enterprise we are developing an ambition to evolve our teaching processes into a permaculture academy. If we are to reach more people and spread permaculture wider we will need to train more teachers.

Permaculture is all about learning by experience, so in this PDC we are trying to create the opportunity for new teachers to learn and gain experience. Along with 43 participants we have 6 trainee teachers and three experts as well developing practical tasks relatiing to the course content. Early days maybe but we are reciving invitations to teach in more and more places and this is driving us to think more seriously about this proposition. So in some ways we have the aim of catching and storing the experience of the course by providing learning experiences that will in turn create new teachers.

Sunshine and showers, the site is booming!

What we human do in the next 50 years dictates what will happen in the next 10,000 for planet earth.
Professor Johan Rokstrom

On the evening of day one we watched the WWF climate change lecture from Dec 2015 led by Johan Rokstrom. We are confronted with the stark reality that humans have passed the carrying capacity of the planet. Human activity is now the most significant factor affecting the atmosphere and climate of planet earth. This new era of human driven global change is to be known as the ‘anthropocene’.

The upside of reality is that if we humans are the most significant force for destruction on the planet, then we can also be a force for repairing it. Catching and storing energy means building soils, adding carbon via humus, compost, mulches, biochar, low tillage and no dig systems, working with the biology of the planet to heal at least some of the damage we have done. It was only in about 1990 that humans became this dominant presence, and over the coming 30 years we will have to fix it, if we wish to preserve any semblance of the world we evolved to be part of.

This is young girl is banking on a sustainable future. Sabina school is embracing permaculture as a tool for long-term global health.

Permaculture is fun, a PDC generates a huge amount of positive energy but underlying the work we do are huge challenges and potentially terrifying threats. Facing these challenges will take a great many people working together towards common goals and with a common vision, I honestly believe permaculture is the best tool we have to achieve this.

permaculture notes

Notes by Nina Moon

Arrivals day, preparing to start

As we prepare for the course beginning tomorrow I was pleased to see a post from Prince Sebe Maloba who was a graduate of the #PDCUG17 course held in Kamuli last year. Permaculture is a set of strategies that really work, to restore land, build soil and fertilitity where previously it has been depleted.  If we are to successfully fight the on set of climate change and build food security then I know no better way. Permaculture is the most powerful tool we have to secure a sustainable future. Follow this blog over the coming fortnight to see the progress of the course.

sebe

This land was barren due to over use of chemical fertilizer and nothing could grow beyond two feet,we decided to use permaculture techniques of fixing nitrogen in the soil using velvet beans and calindra trees as green manure and organic fertilizer after one year now the soil fertility increased, own my among my best farmer now harvest 25 bags of maize on half an acre of land.

Green manure is effective in soil restoration there is big change as crop cover control weeds, temperature, hold more water,control soil erosion, provide soil fertility ,this is one the best farmer have, maize plantation is purely organic, its the way to go.   Prince Sebe Maloba

Volunteers have been on site for weeks prior to the event here at Sabina. Grace and Nina from Wales and Luigi from Uganda. Beds have been planted, compost toilets made, and enournous amounts of preparation has been underway that i cant do justice to here. I have seen all three volunteers blossom and benefit form the hard work as the benefits begin to show. The school is already transformed before the course has even begun.

nina moon

Preparing food in the staff area. Nina Moon has been a star volunteer, here for 6 weeks before the event helping prepare the site and set things in motion for the event as well as helping feed the teaching team when they arrived.

img_0843

Mandala garden at Sabina, one of the many projects taken on by the volunteer team in preparation for the PDC

 

img_0874

Volunteer Grace has also been on site now for 6 weeks, here she is with Sabina member Tom making plans for the day’s work

Day 1: Permaculture begins with observation

Meet Helen’s home group!

Home team PDCUG18 Sabina

Enock, John Robert, Helen, Joseph, Laura

There are about 40 people on the course so we have created ‘home groups’ of 5 or 6 people with a facilitator from the teaching team. These home groups will give people a chance to get know a few people in more depth. They will also be allocated a task each morning to help with the smooth running of the course and site. Today Helen’s team were given the task of developing material for the blog so we decided to share our highlights from day one.

The theme of day one is observation and interaction and in that spirit the afternoon practical was a walk round the site seeing what was there and thinking about how the natural systems work.

Water held in the landscape

John Robert was interested to see how water can be caught in the landscape and how many different crops can be grown in a small area. Joseph was interested in the concept of planting food forests and making compost.

In the evenings we watch relevant videos and Laura was moved by the one we watched on the eve of the course starting. It showed astronauts talking about their emotions on first seeing earth from space. They became intensely aware of the fragility of the earth hanging in space and the importance of everyone working together to protect and improve it.

Compost toilet ready for action

Enock was amazed by the compost toilet, he has never seen one before. The toilets are not quite ready so he is looking forward to making his first deposit!

Helen has been on site for a week now helping to get ready for the course. It is very different now that everyone has arrived and the number of new people feels a bit overwhelming. It is humbling to see how many people have come, some traveling a long way to learn about Permaculture. It won’t be long before we go from being a group of strangers to becoming friends.

Most of the participants are staying in dormitories near where the children at the school stay. This morning they were woken up at 6.30am by the sounds of the children doing their morning exercises. Realising they weren’t going to get back to sleep many joined in with exercises instead.

East African MP visits Sabina

Honourable visitor Hon. KASAMBA Mathias MP East African Legislative Assembly

Sabina was honoured by a visit from the regional representitive of the East African Parliament, Mr Mathias Kasamba. Also a farmer, Mr Kasamba is an enthusiast for jack fruit. This tree is originally from East Asia and its amazing fruit has many uses and health benefits. The PDC has been attracting interest from a wide variety of local dignitaries and the Head Teacher here, Jude has been quick to capitalise on that. It is great to be noticed and our intention to create a wave of interest in Permaculture seems to be paying off.

We must thank Mr Mathias who as donated 200 jack fruit seedlings to Sabina School, which we will be planting in the school forest garden as part of our design practical work.

 

Dedicated site

This site is dedicated to the PDCUG18 and EAPC18 Uganda

© 2018: PDCUG18 | GREEN EYE Theme by: D5 Creation | Powered by: WordPress